Feb 28, 2013

Save Money with the Child Tax Credit

Wow kids, you got to love to them. So does the IRS!

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-18

If you have a child under age 17, the Child Tax Credit may save you money at tax-time. Here are some facts the IRS wants you to know about the credit.
  • Amount. The non-refundable Child Tax Credit may help reduce your federal income tax by up to $1,000 for each qualifying child you claim on your return.
  • Qualifications. For this credit, a qualifying child must pass seven tests:
1. Age test. The child must have been under age 17 at the end of 2012.
2. Relationship test. The child must be your son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, or stepsister. A child may also be a descendant of any of these individuals, including your grandchild, niece or nephew. You would always treat an adopted child as your own child. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption.
3. Support test. The child must not have provided more than half of their own support for the year.
4. Dependent test. You must claim the child as a dependent on your federal tax return.
5. Joint return test. The child cannot file a joint return for the year, unless the only reason they are filing is to claim a refund.
6. Citizenship test. The child must be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national or U.S. resident alien.
7. Residence test. In most cases, the child must have lived with you for more than half of 2012.
  • Limitations. The Child Tax Credit is subject to income limitations, and may be reduced or eliminated depending on your filing status and income.
  • Additional Child Tax Credit. If you qualify and get less than the full Child Tax Credit, you could receive a refund even if you owe no tax with the refundable Additional Child Tax Credit.
  • Schedule 8812. If you qualify to claim the Child Tax Credit make sure to check whether you must complete and attach the new Schedule 8812, Child Tax Credit, with your return. If you qualify to claim the Additional Child Tax Credit, you must complete and attach Schedule 8812.
IRS Publication 972, Child Tax Credit, can provide you with more details. View it online at IRS.gov or request it by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676). You can also use the Interactive Tax Assistant tool on the IRS website to check if you can claim the credit. The ITA is a resource that can help answer tax law questions.

Feb 27, 2013

Five Facts to Know about Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)

The Tax Factor Blog during tax season = Tax Tips from the IRS until April

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-17

The Alternative Minimum Tax may apply to you if your income is above a certain amount. Here are five facts the IRS wants you to know about the AMT:

1. You may have to pay the tax if your taxable income plus certain adjustments is more than the AMT exemption amount for your filing status.
2. The 2012 AMT exemption amounts for each filing status are:
  • Single and Head of Household = $50,600;
  • Married Filing Joint and Qualifying Widow(er) = $78,750; and
  • Married Filing Separate = $39,375.
3. AMT attempts to ensure that some individuals and corporations who claim certain exclusions, tax deductions and tax credits pay a minimum amount of tax.
4. You should use IRS e-file to prepare and file your tax return. You figure AMT using different rules than those you use to figure your regular income tax. IRS e-file software will determine if you owe AMT, and if you do, it will figure the tax for you.
5. If you file a paper return, use the AMT Assistant tool on IRS.gov to find out if you may need to pay the tax.
Visit IRS.gov for more information about AMT. You should also check Form 6251, Alternative Minimum Tax – Individuals and its instructions. Both are available at IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

Feb 26, 2013

IRS Reminds Taxpayers to Report 2010 Roth Conversions on 2012 Returns

The Tax Factor Blog during tax season = Tax Tips from the IRS until April

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:


The Internal Revenue Service reminds taxpayers who converted amounts to a Roth IRA or designated Roth account in 2010 that in most cases they must report half of the resulting taxable income on their 2012 returns.

Normally, Roth conversions are taxable in the year the conversion occurs. For example, the taxable amount from a 2012 conversion must be included in full on a 2012 return. But under a special rule that applied only to 2010 conversions, taxpayers generally include half the taxable amount in their income for 2011 and half for 2012, unless they chose to include all of it in income on their 2010 return.

Roth conversions in 2010 from traditional IRAs are shown on 2012 Form 1040, Line 15b, or Form 1040A, Line 11b. Conversions from workplace retirement plans, including in-plan rollovers to designated Roth accounts, are reported on Form 1040, Line 16b, or Form 1040A, Line 12b.

Taxpayers who also received Roth distributions in either 2010 or 2011 may be able to report a smaller taxable amount for 2012. For details, see the discussion under 2012 Reporting of 2010 Roth Rollovers and Conversions on IRS.gov. In addition, worksheets and examples can be found in Publication 590 for Roth IRA conversions and Publication 575 for conversions to designated Roth accounts.

Taxpayers who made Roth conversions in 2012 or are planning to do so in 2013 or later years must file Form 8606 to report the conversion.

As in 2010 and 2011, income limits no longer apply to Roth IRA conversions.

Feb 25, 2013

Important Reminders about Tip Income

The Tax Factor Blog during tax season = Tax Tips from the IRS until April

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-16

If your pay from your job includes tips, the IRS has a few important reminders about tip income:
  • Tips are taxable. Individuals must pay federal income tax on any tips they receive. The value of non-cash tips, such as tickets, passes or other items of value are also subject to income tax.
  • Include all tips on your return. You must include all tips that you receive during the year on your income tax return. This includes tips you received directly from customers, tips added to credit cards and your share of tips received under a tip-splitting agreement with other employees.
  • Report tips to your employer. If you receive $20 or more in cash tips in any one month, you must report your tips for that month to your employer. Your employer is required to withhold federal income, Social Security and Medicare taxes on the reported tips.
  • Keep a daily log of tips. You can use IRS Publication 1244, Employee's Daily Record of Tips and Report to Employer, to record your tips.
For more information, see IRS Publication 1244 or Publication 531, Reporting Tip Income. Both are available at IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM

Feb 22, 2013

Safeguard Your Refund – Choose Direct Deposit

Yup, more advice from the IRS!

Here is a word from the Goodfellas from the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-15
Direct deposit is the fast, easy and safe way to receive your tax refund. Whether you file electronically or on paper, direct deposit gives you access to your refund faster than a paper check.
Here are four reasons more than 80 million taxpayers chose direct deposit in 2012:

1. Security. Every year the U.S. Postal Service returns thousands of paper checks to the IRS as undeliverable. Direct deposit eliminates the possibility of a lost, stolen or undeliverable refund check.
2. Convenience. With direct deposit, the money goes directly into your bank account. You will not have to make a special trip to the bank to deposit the money yourself.
3. Ease. It’s easy to choose direct deposit. When you are preparing your tax return, simply follow the instructions on the tax return or in the tax software. Make sure you enter the correct bank account and bank routing transit numbers.
4. Options. You can deposit your refund into more than one account. With the split refund option, taxpayers can divide their refunds among as many as three checking or savings accounts and up to three different U.S. financial institutions. Use IRS Form 8888, Allocation of Refund (Including Savings Bond Purchases), to divide your refund. If you are designating part of your refund to pay your tax preparer, you should not use Form 8888. You should only deposit your refund directly into accounts that are in your own name, your spouse’s name or both if it’s a joint account.
Some banks require both spouses’ names on the account to deposit a tax refund from a joint return. Check with your bank for their direct deposit requirements.

Check the instructions in your tax form for more information about direct deposit and the split refund option. Helpful tips on both are also available in IRS Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax. Publication 17 and IRS Form 8888 are available on IRS.gov or by calling the IRS at 1-800-TAX-FORM (1-800-829-3676).

Feb 21, 2013

Tax Help ‘en Español’

Don't speak great english? No problem, the IRS still wants your money!

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-14

Tax information can be tough to understand in any language. It may be more difficult to understand if it is not in your first language. The IRS offers a wide range of free and easy-to-use products and services for Spanish-speaking taxpayers. Here are some tips if you need federal tax assistance from the IRS in Spanish.
  • Get answers 24 hours a day seven days a week. IRS.gov/espanol has a wealth of information accessible every day for individuals and businesses. You will find links to tax-related information and warnings about common tax scams that can victimize taxpayers. You can also check the status of your tax refund through the improved online tool “¿Dónde está mi reembolso?” Using the Asistente EITC, you can find out if you qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit, a refundable tax credit for many people who earned less than $50,270.
  • Use Free File to prepare and e-file your taxes for free. IRS Free File offers free tax preparation and e-file options for all taxpayers. The Free File program is a partnership between the IRS and the Free File Alliance. The Alliance is a group of private-sector software companies. If your 2012 income was $57,000 or less, you qualify to use free tax software. If your income was higher, or you are comfortable preparing your own tax return, there's Free File Fillable Forms, the electronic versions of IRS paper forms. Visit IRS.gov/freefile and select ‘En Español’ to review your options.
  • Try IRS e-file to file your return. IRS e-file is the safe, easy and most common way to file a tax return. The IRS has processed more than 1 billion returns safely and securely. If you owe taxes, you have payment options to file early and pay by the April 15 tax deadline. Visit IRS.gov/espanol and select Opciones Electrónicas to review your options.
  • Get up-to-date at the Multimedia Center. Watch YouTube video tax tips and listen to podcasts on various IRS topics in Spanish and English. Enter the keywords “Centro Multimediático” into the search box of the IRS.gov website.
  • TeleTax gives you tax and refund information. TeleTax is a toll-free, automated telephone service. It provides helpful pre-recorded tax topic messages and refund information. You can find a list of more than 125 TeleTax topics available in Spanish and English in the instructions for Form 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ. When you call to check your refund status, have a copy of your tax return handy. This will help you respond to the system prompts. TeleTax is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 800-829-4477.
  • Get tax forms and publications. You can view and download several tax forms and publications in Spanish directly from IRS.gov/espanol at any hour of the day or night.
  • Visit the IRS Spanish Newsroom. Find the agency’s most recent announcements, tips and information on new tax laws that could affect you. Avoid missing any benefits and keep up to date by typing the keywords “Noticias en Espanol” into the search box of the IRS.gov website.
  • Call the IRS for free tax help in Spanish. The IRS’ toll-free telephone number offers service from Spanish-speaking IRS representatives. Call the IRS customer service line at 800-829-1040 and then press the number 8.
  • Stay connected through Twitter en Español. Get all the newest information and helpful tax tips in Spanish by following the IRS on Twitter @IRSenEspanol.
  • Get Multilingual Assistance at IRS Taxpayer Assistance Centers. Visitors can get help at IRS Taxpayer Assistance Centers in more than 150 languages, including Spanish, either in person or through an Over-the-Phone Interpreter. Before you visit, it’s always a good idea to check TAC locations, hours and available services by visiting IRS.gov and clicking on ‘Help & Resources’ and then on ‘Contact Your Local IRS Office.’

Feb 20, 2013

Determining Your Correct Filing Status

Until tax season is over, I'm just the messenger. It's all about the IRS until May.

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS TAX TIP 2013-13

It’s important to use the correct filing status when filing your income tax return. It can impact the tax benefits you receive, the amount of your standard deduction and the amount of taxes you pay. It may even impact whether you must file a federal income tax return.

Are you single, married or the head of your household? There are five filing statuses on a federal tax return. The most common are "Single," "Married Filing Jointly" and "Head of Household." The Head of Household status may be the one most often claimed in error.

The IRS offers these seven facts to help you choose the best filing status for you.

1. Marital Status. Your marital status on the last day of the year is your marital status for the entire year.
2. If You Have a Choice. If more than one filing status fits you, choose the one that allows you to pay the lowest taxes.
3. Single Filing Status. Single filing status generally applies if you are not married, divorced or legally separated according to state law.
4. Married Filing Jointly. A married couple may file a return together using the Married Filing Jointly status. If your spouse died during 2012, you usually may still file a joint return for that year.
5. Married Filing Separately. If a married couple decides to file their returns separately, each person’s filing status would generally be Married Filing Separately.
6. Head of Household. The Head of Household status generally applies if you are not married and have paid more than half the cost of maintaining a home for yourself and a qualifying person.
7. Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child. This status may apply if your spouse died during 2010 or 2011, you have a dependent child and you meet certain other conditions.
IRS e-file is the easiest way to file and will help you determine the correct filing status. If you file a paper return, the Interactive Tax Assistant at IRS.gov is a tool that will help you choose your filing status.

You can also find more helpful information in IRS Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information. This publication is available at IRS.gov or by calling 1-800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

Feb 19, 2013

Eight Tax Benefits for Parents‏

I have a two-year old son.....nuff said (lol)!!!

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-11

Your children may help you qualify for valuable tax benefits, such as certain credits and deductions. If you are a parent, here are eight benefits you shouldn’t miss when filing taxes this year.

1. Dependents. In most cases, you can claim a child as a dependent even if your child was
 born anytime in 2012. For more information, see IRS Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction and Filing Information.
2. Child Tax Credit. You may be able to claim the Child Tax Credit for each of your children that were under age 17 at the end of 2012. If you do not benefit from the full amount of the credit, you may be eligible for the Additional Child Tax Credit. For more information, see the instructions for Schedule 8812, Child Tax Credit, and Publication 972, Child Tax Credit.
3. Child and Dependent Care Credit. You may be able to claim this credit if you paid someone to care for your child or children under age 13, so that you could work or look for work. See IRS Publication 503, Child and Dependent Care Expenses.
4. Earned Income Tax Credit. If you worked but earned less than $50,270 last year, you may qualify for EITC. If you have qualifying children, you may get up to $5,891 dollars extra back when you file a return and claim it. Use the EITC Assistant to find out if you qualify. See Publication 596, Earned Income Tax Credit.
5. Adoption Credit. You may be able to take a tax credit for certain expenses you incurred to adopt a child. For details about this credit, see the instructions for IRS Form 8839, Qualified Adoption Expenses.
6. Higher education credits. If you paid higher education costs for yourself or another student who is an immediate family member, you may qualify for either the American Opportunity Credit or the Lifetime Learning Credit. Both credits may reduce the amount of tax you owe. If the American Opportunity Credit is more than the tax you owe, you could be eligible for a refund of up to $1,000. See IRS Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education.
7. Student loan interest. You may be able to deduct interest you paid on a qualified student loan, even if you do not itemize your deductions. For more information, see IRS Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education.
8. Self-employed health insurance deduction - If you were self-employed and paid for health insurance, you may be able to deduct premiums you paid to cover your child. It applies to children under age 27 at the end of the year, even if not your dependent. See IRS.gov/aca for information on the Affordable Care Act.
Forms and publications on these topics are available at IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

Feb 18, 2013

Missing Your W-2? Here’s What to Do

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-10
It’s a good idea to have all your tax documents together before preparing your 2012 tax return. You will need your W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, which employers should send by the end of January. Give it two weeks to arrive by mail.

If you have not received your W-2, follow these three steps:

1. Contact your employer first. Ask your employer – or former employer – to send your W-2 if it has not already been sent. Make sure your employer has your correct address.
2. Contact the IRS. After February 14, you may call the IRS at 800-829-1040 if you have not yet received your W-2. Be prepared to provide your name, address, Social Security number and phone number. You should also have the following information when you call:
• Your employer’s name, address and phone number;
• Your employment dates; and
• An estimate of your wages and federal income tax withheld in 2012, based upon your final pay stub or leave-and-earnings statement, if available.
3. File your return on time. You should still file your tax return on or before April 15, 2013, even if you have not yet received your W-2. File Form 4852, Substitute for Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, in place of the W-2. Use the form to estimate your income and withholding taxes as accurately as possible. The IRS may delay processing your return while it verifies your information.
If you need more time to file you can get a six-month extension of time. File Form 4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File US Individual Income Tax Return. If you are requesting an extension, you must file this form on or before April 15, 2013.

If you receive the missing W-2 after filing your tax return and the information on the W-2 is different from what you reported using Form 4852, then you must correct your tax return. File Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return to amend your tax return.

Forms and instructions are available at IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

Feb 15, 2013

Six Important Facts about Dependents and Exemptions

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-09

While each individual tax return is unique, there are some tax rules that affect every person who files a federal income tax return. These rules involve dependents and exemptions. The IRS has six important facts about dependents and exemptions that will help you file your 2012 tax return.

1. Exemptions reduce taxable income. There are two types of exemptions: personal exemptions and exemptions for dependents. You can deduct $3,800 for each exemption you claim on your 2012 tax return.
2. Personal exemptions. You usually may claim one exemption for yourself on your tax return. You also can claim one for your spouse if you are married and file a joint return. If you and your spouse file separate returns, you may claim the exemption for your spouse only if he or she had no gross income, is not filing a joint return and was not the dependent of another taxpayer.
3. Exemptions for dependents. Generally, you can claim an exemption for each of your dependents. A dependent is either your qualifying child or qualifying relative. If you are married, you may not claim your spouse as your dependent. You must list the Social Security Number of each dependent you claim on your return. See Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information, for information about dependents who do not have Social Security numbers.
4. Some people do not qualify as dependents. While there are some exceptions, you generally may not claim a married person as a dependent if they file a joint return with their spouse.
5. Dependents may have to file. If you can claim someone else as your dependent on your tax return, that person may still be required to file his or her own tax return. Whether they must file a return depends on several factors, including the amount of their gross income (both earned and unearned income), their marital status and any special taxes they owe.
6. Dependents can’t claim a personal exemption. If you can claim another person as a dependent on your tax return, that person may not claim a personal exemption on his or her own tax return. This is true even if you do not actually claim that person as your dependent on your tax return. The fact that you could claim that person disqualifies them from claiming a personal exemption.
Remember that a person must meet several tests in order for you to claim them as your dependent. See Publication 501 for the tests you will use to determine if you can claim a person as your dependent.

You can view or download Publication 501 at IRS.gov or order it by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676). You can also use the Interactive Tax Assistant at IRS.gov to find out if a person qualifies as your dependent. The ITA is a helpful tool that can answer many of your tax law questions.

Feb 14, 2013

Top 10 Ways to Get Help from IRS.gov

Yep, it's tax season. I will posting IRS tips all tax season.

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-08
When you’re looking for tax information, you want to find it as quickly and easily as possible. That’s why the IRS redesigned its website. It’s now even more user friendly. Here are the top 10 reasons to visit IRS.gov:

1. Get 24/7 Access. Whether you do your taxes during the day or burn the midnight oil, IRS.gov has the tax forms and answers you need when you need them. It's accessible all day, every day. The Interactive Tax Assistant is a helpful tool that will answer many of your tax law questions. Several tax forms, publications and information are also available in Spanish.
2. Use Free File. Anyone can prepare and e-file their taxes for free with IRS Free File. Offered exclusively at IRS.gov, Free File’s brand name software or fillable forms do the work for you. If you made $57,000 or less, you qualify to use free tax software. If your income is more than $57,000 or you feel comfortable preparing your own tax return, use Free File Fillable Forms. This option provides the electronic versions of IRS paper forms.
3. Try IRS e-file. Whether you do your own taxes or hire a preparer, IRS e-file is the safest, easiest and most popular way to file a complete and accurate tax return. Since 1990, taxpayers have e-filed more than one billion returns. If you owe taxes, e-file gives you options to file early and pay by the tax deadline. If you are due a refund, you should receive it in less than 21 days.
4. Check Your Refund Status. You can track your refund using the enhanced “Where’s My Refund?” tool. It’s quick, easy and secure and has a new look this year. You can start checking on the status of your refund within 24 hours after the IRS has received your e-filed return. You can check your refund status four weeks after you mail a paper return. The tool includes a tracker that displays the progress of your return in three stages while it is processed. Once IRS approves your refund, “Where’s My Refund?” will give a date to expect your refund.
5. Make Payments Electronically. E-payment options are a convenient, safe and secure way to pay taxes. You can authorize an electronic funds withdrawal, use a credit or debit card or enroll in the U.S. Treasury’s Electronic Federal Tax Payment System.
6. Use the EITC Assistant. The Earned Income Tax Credit is a tax credit for working people who earned less than $50,270 in 2012. The credit can be worth as much as $5,891. Check your eligibility using the EITC Assistant tool. You may be among the millions of eligible workers who get the EITC this year.
7. Get Tax Forms and Publications. You can view and download tax forms and publications any time. It’s the easiest way to get IRS forms and publications.
8. Figure the Right Withholding. The IRS Withholding Calculator will help to ensure you don’t have too much or too little income tax withheld from your pay.
9. Request a Payment Agreement. Paying all your taxes on time avoids penalties and interest. However, if you cannot pay your taxes in full you may be eligible to use the Online Payment Agreement Application to request an installment agreement.
10. Get the Latest Tax Law Changes. Learn about tax law changes that may affect your tax return. Special sections of the website highlight changes that affect individual and business taxpayers.
The address of the official IRS website is www.irs.gov. Don’t be misled by sites that claim to be the IRS but end in .com, .net, .org. Some thieves use phony websites to gain your personal and financial information. They then use this information to commit identity theft or steal your money.

Feb 13, 2013

How to Get IRS Forms and Publications

It's tax season and knowledge is power. What is best way to receive this tax knowledge? The best way is receiving the knowledge straight from the IRS. Throughout the tax season, I will be posting advice received from the IRS.

Here is a word from the Goodfellas at the IRS:

IRS Tax Tip 2013-06
The Internal Revenue Service provides free tax forms and publications on a wide variety of topics – from tax credits for individuals to a tax guide for small businesses.

Here are four easy ways to obtain tax forms and publications from the IRS:

1. On the Internet. You can get IRS forms and instructions quickly and easily by visiting the IRS.gov website 24 hours a day 7 days a week. They often appear online before they are available on paper. To view and download tax products, select “Forms and Pubs.”
2. By Telephone. Call 1-800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676) Monday through Friday, 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. local time to order current or prior year forms and instructions or IRS publications. Hours of service in Alaska and Hawaii follow Pacific Time. You will receive your order by mail, usually within 7 to 10 days.
3. In IRS Taxpayer Assistance Centers. There are Taxpayer Assistance Centers located across the country where you can pick up many IRS forms and publications. IRS offices also offer face-to-face help for taxpayers who want personal tax assistance.
To find the Center nearest to you, visit IRS.gov and click on “Help & Resources” and then “Contact Your Local IRS Office.” Select your state for a list of offices, as well as a list of services available at each office. You can also find a Center near you by using the “Office Locator” link, which allows you to search by using your zip code.
4. In Your Community. Many libraries and post offices offer free tax forms during the tax filing season. Some libraries also have copies of commonly requested IRS publications.
For additional information about free IRS tax products and services, see Publication 2053A, Quick and Easy Access to IRS Tax Help and Forms, and Publication 910, IRS Guide to Free Tax Services.

Feb 12, 2013

Tax Organizer for Truckers




Expenses of traveling away fro “home” overnight for job-related reasons are deductible. Your “home” is generally considered to be the entire city or general area where your principal place of employment is located. Out-of-town expenses include transportation, meals, lodging, tips, and miscellaneous items like laundry, valet, etc.

Document your away-from-home expenses by nothing the date, destination, and business purpose of your trip. In addition, keep a detailed record of your expenses-lodging, public transportation, meals, etc. Always list meals and lodging separately in your record. Receipts must be retained for each lodging expense. However if any other business expense is less than $75, a receipt is not necessary if you record all the information in a timely diary. Keep track of the full amount of meal and entertainment expenses even though only a portion of the amount may be deductible.


Use this section to record miscellaneous expenses of supplies and services you are responsible for when you are on the road. For example, you may be required to fax or mail an important document back to your home office; such expensive is deductible if it is not reimbursed by your employer.


Generally to be deductible, items must be ordinary and necessary to your job. If you are an employee, only amounts not reimbursable by your employer are deductible. Record separately from other supplies, items costing over $100 and having a useful life of more than one year. These items must be recovered differently on you tax return than recurring everyday business expenses like maps, etc.

If you are required to wear a uniform, the cost and upkeep may be deductible. IRS rules specify that expense for work clothing and its maintenance is deductible if: (1) the uniforms are required by your employer (if you are an employee); and (2) the clothes are not adaptable to ordinary street wear.


Since special rules apply to deductions for cellular and similar items (called “listed property” in the tax rules), it is important to track their business and personal use carefully. Such property potentially qualifies for larger current deductions when it’s used more than 50% for business. Keep your bills for cellular phone use and mark all business calls.


Union or other professional dues are deductible. Amounts paid to a union which are mean to go toward defraying your personal expenses are not deductible. However, any part of union payments which go into a strike fund is deductible.


Use this section to record expenses that don’t easily fit to other categories. For example, if you look for a job in the same line of work, you may deduct the expenses. Such expenses could include mileage to interviews, resume preparation, etc.        

Bath & Shower
Bus & Subway
Car Rental
Laundry Supplies
Locker Fees
Lodging (do not combine with meals)
Meals – Actual Cost (do not combine with lodging)
Number of Days Away From Home
Tips, Porter, Bagging Handling, etc.
Ice Cheat
Map Book
Trade Publications
Uniform Cleaning
Uniform Repairs
Business Cards
Insurance – Business
Legal & Professional Services
Publications - Trade
Testing – Job Related


Back Supporter (Belt)
Fire Extinguisher
First Aid Kit
Glasses – Safety
Glasses - Sun
Gloves – Driving
Gloves – Work
Seat Cushion
Shoes/Boots – Safety

Cellular Phone
Citizens Band Radio
Long Range Communications
Weather Receiver

FAX Expenses
Fed-X, UPS, etc.
Office Supplies

Association Dues
Security Bond
Travel Card Fees
Union Dues